Posts Tagged With: high blood pressure

World Salt Awareness Week

 

This week is “World Salt Awareness Week”


 
World Salt Awareness Week“World Salt Awareness Week” is held from Monday March 11th to Sunday 17th March. This year’s theme is Less Salt Please, showing how you can reduce the salt in your diet without compromising taste and flavour. For more information visit World Action on Salt website.

When it comes to awareness about salt (sodium) consumption, most of us know that consuming too much salt can hurt our health. “Too much sodium raises blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke,” says CDC Director Dr. Thomas R. Frieden

But for many people, the awareness stops there; they don’t realize where most of the salt they take in is coming from. Is it the salt shaker on the table or by the stove? Is it the salt that naturally occurs in foods? These are indeed the source of some of the salt Americans consume, but the greatest amount—about 65 percent–comes from packaged foods and restaurant items.

According to the CDC, 10 types of foods are responsible for more than 40 percent of people’s sodium intake: luncheon meats such as deli ham or turkey; pizza; poultry; soups; cheeseburgers and other sandwiches; pasta dishes; meat dishes such as meat loaf; and snack foods such as potato chips, pretzels and popcorn; and breads and rolls, which in themselves are not too high in sodium until you consider the amount that we typically eat of these products.[1]

You can lower your sodium intake by eating fresh, unprocessed foods, and reading product labels to select those lower in sodium. Talk to your healthcare provider about your sodium consumption. To learn more, visit cdc.gov/salt [2]
 
 
 
 
 
Source:

[1] March 11- 17 is World Salt Awareness Week 2013 rosecrest.org Copyright © IlluminAge AgeWise, 2013
[2] Salt Awareness Week 2013 heinzsight.com.au
 
 
 

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Blood Pressure: Salt and other considerations

 
If in the average american diet soduim was reduced by 1,200 mg per day 68,000 lives would be saved each year. A recommendation to Congress, by The Institute of Medicine, would require the FDA to enact regulations to reduce added-sodium in prepared foods. We need to police ourselves and limit processed foods from our diet.

Americans consume nearly 3,600 mg of sodium each day. This is nearly twice the recommended amount. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends being an avid label reader. All nutritional facts are now required to be on all packaging to help us make healthier choices. Sodium will be listed on the nutritional label as milligrams (mg) with the Daily Value per serving. Other ingredients that have a sodium compound and should be considered are:
 

  • “baking soda”
  • “baking powder”
  • “disodium phosphate”
  • “sodium alginate”
  • “sodium nitrate”
  • “sodium monosodium glutamate”
  • “MSG”

 

 

What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About(TM): Hypertension: The Revolutionary Nutrition and Lifestyle Program to Help Fight High Blood Pressure

 
 
If the nutritional label states there is more then 200 mg per serving it’s best to avoid the product. Label’s don’t always mean what you think. Be conscience of the language on the label.
 

  • “Reduced Sodium” is a 25% reduction in the food
  • “Sodium free” is less than 5mg of sodium per serving
  • “Very low sodium” is 35 mg of sodium or less per serving
  • “Low sodium” is 140 mg of sodium or less per serving
  • “unsalted” or “no salt added” or “without added salt” contain only natural sodium

There are three ways sodium finds its way into your diet, says MayoClinic.Com. There is natural sodium in such foods as milk, celery and other vegetables. Then there’s table salt that we add as seasoning while cooking. Finally, there’s the sodium added to processed and prepared foods for flavor and preservation.

According to the National Institutes of Health, healthy adults shouldn’t consume more than 2,300 mg of sodium each day–equivalent to the sodium in 1 tsp of salt. Although if you have hypertension, sodium consumption should be limited to 1,500 mg daily.

Make changes by choosing more fruits and vegetables over high sodium foods such as hot dogs, processed lunch meats, bacon and ham. Certain condiments such as salad dressing, mustard and soy sauce can be high in sodium and should be used sparingly. Read the label of fresh and frozen meat and poultry, which can be injected with sodium.

The challenge to lowering you sodium intake will be putting away the salt shaker. Helping will be eating real food and minimally processed foods. A combination of real food and decreasing your sodium intake will help in lowering blood pressure.
 
 

 

The Blood Pressure Cure: 8 Weeks to Lower Blood Pressure without Prescription Drugs

 
 
 
 

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Hypertension – Salt Substitute

Hypertension – Lowering Blood Pressure By Decreasing Your Salt Intake

If in the average american diet soduim was reduced by 1,200 mg per day 68,000 lives would be saved each year. A recommendation to Congress, by The Institute of Medicine, would require the FDA to enact regulations to reduce added-sodium in prepared foods. We need to police ourselves and limit processed foods from our diet.

Americans consume nearly 3,600 mg of sodium each day. This is nearly twice the recommended amount. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends being an avid label reader. All nutritional facts are now required to be on all packaging to help us make healthier choices. Sodium will be listed on the nutritional label as milligrams (mg) with the Daily Value per serving. Other ingredients that have a sodium compound and should be considered are:

 

  • “baking soda”
  • “baking powder”
  • “disodium phosphate”
  • “sodium alginate”
  • “sodium nitrate”
  • “sodium monosodium glutamate”
  • “sodium monosodium glutamate”
  • “MSG”

 
If the nutritional label states there is more then 200 mg per serving it’s best to avoid the product. Label’s don’t always mean what you think. Be conscience of the language on the label.
 

  • “Reduced Sodium” is a 25% reduction in the food
  • “Sodium free” is less than 5mg of sodium per serving
  • “Very low sodium” is 35 mg of sodium or less per serving
  • “Low sodium” is 140 mg of sodium or less per serving
  • “unsalted” or “no salt added” or “without added salt” contain only natural sodium

 
There are three ways sodium finds its way into your diet, says MayoClinic.Com. There is natural sodium in such foods as milk, celery and other vegetables. Then there’s table salt that we add as seasoning while cooking. Finally, there’s the sodium added to processed and prepared foods for flavor and preservation.

According to the National Institutes of Health, healthy adults shouldn’t consume more than 2,300 mg of sodium each day–equivalent to the sodium in 1 tsp of salt. Although if you have hypertension, sodium consumption should be limited to 1,500 mg daily.

Make changes by choosing more fruits and vegetables over high sodium foods such as hot dogs, processed lunch meats, bacon and ham. Certain condiments such as salad dressing, mustard and soy sauce can be high in sodium and should be used sparingly. Read the label of fresh and frozen meat and poultry, which can be injected with sodium.

The challenge to lowering you sodium intake will be putting away the salt shaker. Helping will be eating real food and minimally processed foods. A combination of real food and decreasing your sodium intake will help in lowering blood pressure.

There are salt substitutes on the market which just don’t cut it. I’ve tried most of them, but you can be the judge and try them yourself. I will share with you I have found a product I like. It is the closest thing to the salt taste I’ve found, it’s TRUE lemon. It took me a bit to find it at a grocery store that carried it. Check the TRUE Citrus website for locations.
 
 
 

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